The Panasonic DVX200 – 4K Large-Sensor Camcorder

Finally here’s some very interesting news from Panasonic. The new Panasonic DVX200 that was just announced, is the successor to the legendary DVX100 camcorder that once held the bar for what a compact professional and ergonomic camcorder should be. The DVX200 is here to take up that standard. Will it live up to it?

panasonic-dvx200-4k

What’s definitely impressive is its bold design, but there are some interesting things under the hood as well. 4K recording on a “large sensor” (Micro Four Thirds) with a built in fixed lens that is said to be a perfect package for ergonomic professional shooting.

This camera might be just what many documentary filmmakers and news shooters have been looking for.
The most important specs at a glance:

  • 4K/60p recording
  • 13X optical zoom
  • V-Log L gamma curve (12 stops of latitude, target)
  • Said to carry the VariCam family characteristics of filmic tonality

The camera is targeted to be shipping in fall of 2015 with a suggested list price under $5000.
rode_banner
filmconvert

 

avatar
14 Comment threads
3 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
4 Comment authors
Panasonic UX90/180 – UHD/4K Capable ENG-Style Work Horses – CinePEPOnsetoffline | Barry Green’s Panasonic Dvx200 Book Available As Free DownloadOnsetoffline | First Panasonic Dvx200 Review & Footage – a Doc-shooter’s Dream Come True?Moses Ludelمعرفی دوربین Panasonic DVX200 4K | کارگردانی Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
trackback

[…] post The Panasonic DVX200 – 4K Large-Sensor Camcorder in Red appeared first on […]

Crimson Son
Member
Crimson Son

Hail to a legend. Along withe Canon XL1, the DVX100 popularized DIY digital film production.

At this point, a bit late to the game. But better than never.

Clayton Moore
Member

Looks pretty good. I think filmic tonality will be a big deal here. People can just drone on about images looking too “video like” so if Panasonic via a V-log gamma curve and smoother tonality can over come that objection then they’ll really have something here.

There is something to be said to just pulling a camera out of the bag and going for it.

Alexander
Guest
Alexander

Everyone is missing something big here. Yes, its an awesome design…built in N.D. etc… I even own the original DVX100. Movie (NOVEMBER)/was even shot with it along with many credits. So, yes, I know this is huge. I know this camera will probably even look more filmic than the gh4. That is for me what it boils down too. How the image looks at the end of the day. A cinamatic image is a composite of different form factors. Resolution..dynamic range..color rendition..sensor size..etc.. So, I have no doubt the shallow depth of field will be there regardless of its fixed… Read more »

trackback

[…] The Panasonic DVX200 – 4K Large-Sensor Camcorder – Cinema 5D […]

Jake Rose
Member

Remember it was the VX1000 that started the prosumer party.

Alexander Torro
Member
Alexander Torro

Silent moving images were also used to tell a story, but talkies and color did a much better job at suspending disbelief to unfold their story. Yours is a mute point. Just because it was good then, does not mean it will work now, because it has to adapt to the times and technology. Does that make sense? As you see the trend of technology..All cameras are trying to capture that CINEMATIC experience by making their images close to 35mm celluloid film. Sure the dvx100 was groundbreaking!! First digital to offer 24p. Wow. This looks like a movie..not quite. Resolution..not… Read more »

Tarek Saneh
Member

I think the sensor is great for what the camera is, you can put a 12x power zoom lens for a bigger sensor the camera will cost than twice as much, the only problem with this camera is that it record in 4.2.0 not it 4.2.2 witch is a problem for color sampling

Alexander Torro
Member
Alexander Torro

if you work with enough cameras then you would know that’s not good enough. Again, it depends on what your application is. If you’re doing weddings, documentaries, then great. Not for cinema. I understand what your saying, but that’s like adding a speed booster to a gh4. All that allows you to do is extract more of the existing sensor. Does not make the sensor bigger? NO!! There’s a difference. Your bound to the field of view of what this camera will only allow you to capture. A little less or equivalent to 16mm movie. Not even super 16mm movie.… Read more »

Michael Ryden
Member

No necessarily true…. Panasonic has not disclosed this information yet; and the product on display at NAB was a pre-production model – I am hoping for 422 of course.

Tally
Guest
Tally
trackback

[…] Cinema5D […]

Moses Ludel
Guest
Moses Ludel

I am very excited about this affordable run-and-gun DVX200 for my event, motorsports and technical shoots. The biggest weakness with my current AG-series Panasonic is low lighting conditions that demand wide open F-stop plus gain yet still result in “through the screen door” raw footage that always requires extra post-production work. I shoot in a wide range of lighting conditions—often panning with available light. Does anyone want to comment on the ISO equivalent of the DVX200 and its ability to stop down, at least move away from gain, in low lighting conditions? My current ISO is 50 equivalent, some AGs… Read more »

trackback

[…] a micro four thirds 4K video camera that left many shooters both impressed & curious at NAB this year. As a successor to the famous DVX100 it promises all the joys of professional documentary style […]

trackback

[…] form of the DVX200 (a 4K solid-state camcorder with a fixed lens) earlier this year (here’s our news post), it was clear that it’s only a matter of time before Barry releases his thoughts and tips […]

trackback

[…] First off, these are not cinema cameras and Panasonic clearly understands that with how these cameras are spec’ed. Both the UX90 and UX180 fill the professional “Camcorder” line niche nestled right beneath the flashy red DVX200. For more on the big brother in this category (DVX200), read up Sebastian Wöber’s article HERE. […]