Holiday Video: MōVI M10 in Majestic Mode

I’ve been using my MōVI M10 for a few months now and I am still learning – as with any tool, you get better and better over time. In a series of posts about the gimbal-stablizer, I want to share my journey and learned lessons with you, our great audience. The last MōVI post focused on a test shoot that we did on a cobblestone street, driving up to 65mph, and see how well the rig handled the vibrations (click here).

This time I will write about my experiences on my last MōVI shoot: Screenagers, an über-creative Vienna-based digital agency, hired me to shoot a very special “Jingle Bells” video with them after they heard that I had a MōVI M10.

Around 200 IKEA glasses filled with more or less water, tuned to specific musical notes, spread out over their huge agency loft would be the basis for the video. Add some of the folks from Screenagers to play those glasses, and me following all that with the MōVI M10, and the video is almost done :-)

MōVI M10 operated by Nino Leitner in Vienna at Screenagers agency for their Christmas special.

MōVI M10 operated by Nino Leitner in Vienna at Screenagers for a Christmas special.

We thought about trying to really make this happen in one single long take, but it turned out to be impossible because normal work would have had to stop entirely in the agency to make this happen. Also, we would have been forced to compromise the image in some places because of various issues, and last but not least, it would not have turned out that well … so we went for the “invisible cuts” and I think it was a good choice. Can you say how many edits there are in the video?

We used the MōVI M10 with my Canon C300, a 24mm Canon Cinema Prime, a Bartech Remote Follow Focus (although we used it rarely, I tried to keep the same distance to the glasses mostly at around f/5.6 anyway), Teradek Bolt wireless video transmitter and 5″ and 6″ monitors from Marshall (on the MōVI) and Small HD (at the wireless receiver).

Freefly provides a Mac and Android application to fine-tune settings of the MōVI. Those settings allow to make detailed adjustments for various parameters of the device – among them the reaction window and smoothing of pan and tilt modes in the Majestic Mode. The Majestic Mode is Freefly’s name of single operation of the MōVI – without an operator on the supplied remote control. In other words, the MōVI follows one’s movements in this mode, and the application lets you determine how fast that should happen. It’s really dependent on the kind of the shoot you’re on to determine what would be best. Ideally, I would always work with a remote operator who can work with a remote video uplink (like the Teradek Bolt) – however, it’s not always practical and especially if the budget doesn’t allow for an experienced remote control operator you don’t have much choice. (People who regularly operate other remote heads are definitely more capable of operating the MōVI remote than others – it takes quite a bit of practice to get the grip on this.)

 

The final shot almost in the can!

The final shot almost in the can!

The shoot, including camera preparation, took around 10-12 hours. Operating the MōVI for such a long time is really fatiguing as you have to stuck your arms out quite a bit to operate it. It definitely helps to be in good shape if you operate a MōVI, it is very exhausting for your back and lower arms and shoulders after a short time already. If you don’t need to change the height of your shots, consider combining it with an Easyrig like I did on this test shoot (click here).

There’s more great MōVI stuff going online here soon, check back in a few days – we are putting the final touches on a short film I shot for a bunch of students from the Vienna Film Academy in a 24 hour competition sponsored by Red Bull in Berlin. All of it was shot on the MōVI too and it has a really, really special shot in it that you will most likely appreciate :-) Stay tuned and check this space in a few days!

Happy holidays to all of you from the entire crew at cinema5D!

movi_3

 

Credits:

Director: Deniz Arslan
Producer: Screenagers & Nino Film
Cinematography / MōVI operator: Nino Leitner
Sound recordist / Boom operator: Rudi Pototschnig
Team Assistant: Katharina Dietl

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Kazuyuki Nomura Reply
Kazuyuki Nomura December 21, 2013

うっわー!欲しくなる!

Reply
Andre December 21, 2013

Hi Nino,

what a great video!!!!!! Great idea, well shooted …I LOVE IT!

Andre

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner December 22, 2013

Thanks a lot Andre! Really appreciated.

Derek McCabe Reply
Derek McCabe December 21, 2013

Great video! BRAVO!

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner December 22, 2013

Thanks Derek, much appreciated.

Reply
Guido Wilhelm December 21, 2013

Hi Nino, really great! (five cuts)

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner December 22, 2013

Thanks Guido! Correct :)

Reply
Andre December 22, 2013

Nino,

did you used a guitar tuner to tune the glass? also, do you think that the MOVI could be used with a steady cam vest and some kind of adapter for it? please, let me know,

thanks

Andre

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner December 22, 2013

Hi Andre,

I didn’t tune the glasses, the director and somebody else from the agency did. They used a tuner app on the iPhone to match the tones.

Yes, I think the MoVi could be combined with a Steadicam vest – we might try that too. Will keep you posted here :)

Nino

Reply
Carey Lee Cffey December 22, 2013

Great job!

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner January 3, 2014

Thanks Carey!

Reply
Meg December 23, 2013

MōVI ♥ ♥ ♥

Reply
Ludwig December 23, 2013

Mensch Nino! So eine Wasserverschwendung! Good Job und frohe Weihnachten von Hdvideoshop / Kinefinity EU

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner January 3, 2014

Haha! Danke, euch auch nachträglich :-)

Reply
Eric December 23, 2013

Do you use DJI Zenmuse as well?
I heard a lot that their gimbals are also impressive.
I don’t try both of them, so maybe you can share some experience and advice here.
Thanks!

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner January 3, 2014

Haven’t tried it yet but I want to test it on my DJI Phantom (which I am complete novice with). Will try to get a review unit.

Reply
Eric December 23, 2013

Oh By the way, very cool videos.
Thanks so much for sharing.
Merry Christmas to everybody here!

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner January 3, 2014

Thank you Eric!

Reply
Philip Bloom January 14, 2014

Only just seen this sorry. Really terrific well done!

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner January 14, 2014

Thanks mate! My back still hurts from the shoot ;)

Reply
J.Fandino April 12, 2014

I sell plug and play gimbals with the simplebgc controller. Even though our gimbals are economical and quite capable units for most professionals, I have to admit that there’s nothing like what the controllers on the Movi and DJI gimbals provide, stabilization wise.

Their products don’t suffer from horizon drift like our simplebgc controllers do, no matter how well tuned they are, we all suffer from it.
Hopefully the new Alexmos 32bit controllers may improve things, but as long as we don’t rely on GPS units to provide horizon feedback, Alexmos controllers will lack behind in this area, but things are still improving.

Granted, the Movi is about $15, and the DJI for the 5D Mark III is close to $3k+ and it still needs mods to make it work like a regular handheld gimbal, but both are worth the money if you want the very best tools. We provide solutions to retrofit the DJI Z15 gamma of gimbals to be able to use it as a handheld device and enjoy the benefits of superb stabilization for less than $6k, if interested contact me for details.

However, having said that, the landscape of gimbal stabilization is hopefully going to change for good once a company in Israel releases their own IMU and stabilization control unit, which will revolutionize everything we’ve seen so far and bring a healthy dose of competition to the market. Check rcgroups :)

Reply
Mike McLeod June 26, 2014

Awesome video!!! Love the false transitions. Running an m10 and working to dial in the majestic settings, can you share what settings you used for this project?

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner June 26, 2014

Thanks Mike!! Much appreciated. If I only knew … I don’t remember :( … but it’s a fairly low setting in the pan modes …