Gecko Genesis – New Vintage-Flavoured Cine Primes

The new Gecko Genesis series of cinema primes from Gecko-Cam are aimed for those looking to give their images a more vintage look.

Germany-based film equipment and service company Gecko-Cam have put their previous expertise in projectors, lens service and repair into designing their own line of cinema primes. The Gecko Genesis is a line of seven primes in 14.5mm, 20mm, 25mm, 35mm, 50mm, 85mm and 135mm.

This product range has been designed specifically for those who prefer a more vintage vibe to their image, rather than the ultra crisp look of some of the current offerings in the market. There are available in a coated, as well as an uncoated version for some extra vintage mojo.

Michael from Gecko-Cam explains that in terms of image, the Gecko Genesis are reminiscent of the Canon K35, while in terms of price, they are aiming to carve themselves a place in the market in the neighbourhood of the ZEISS CP.3s.

Most of the lenses in the Genesis range offer a maximum aperture of T1.4, with the 14.5mm lens in the range creeping up to T3. All lenses share a frontal diameter of 114mm, and they all range between 1-1.5kg, so a relatively nice weight for cinema glass.

The Gecko Genesis lenses will be available in PL, E, EF and Micro Four-Thirds, although they are easily upgradeable in case you need to change mounts yourself. The lenses are also customisable in that you can replace the ring with imperial and metric markings, and the lens body also features a mounting port for an upcoming Gecko-Cam wireless motor system that will install right onto the lens.

With a 46.3mm image circle, the lenses will cover up to Vista Vision format, so the 8K RED is covered as well as of course 35mm full-frame, meaning they’re compatible with Sony’s latest full-frame CineAlta announcement.

The first batch of ten sets will be available by the end of the month, with more units becoming available in August. The price for a full set will be around the €35,000 mark. For more information, please visit Gecko-cam.com.

Are you more partial to the vintage look, or do you prefer a more crisp and modern flavour? Let us know in the comments below!

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Johnnie BehiriPeter Deakins Ian HunterTechnology AnalystLuuk de Kok Recent comment authors
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Danny Taillon

Something doesn’t add up.
The pictures shows: 14-24-35-50-85-135
but you list 25mm in the article.
14.5mm, 20mm, 25mm, 35mm, 50mm, 85mm and 135mm.

I saw these lenses during NAB and I thought the lens size, aperture, and T stop looks a lot like the Xeen series.
Could it be a simple rehouse? I don’t know but they do look the same.

Luuk de Kok
Member

I Think they made a mistake with the case they are in.
If you look on the lens it says 25, but the case says 24.
I think the right one is the number on the lens :)

Peter Deakins
Member
Peter Deakins

Actually, they didn’t make a mistake with the case, it really is a 24mm from Xeen.

Johnnie Behiri
Admin

The picture above clearly shows a 25mm lens and NOT a 24mm one.

And no, those are not a rehoused Xeen lenses.

Thank you.

Johnnie

Peter Deakins
Member
Peter Deakins

Johnnie, I don’t know about you, but I got my hands on these lenses at the NAB. If the shoe fits, then… These lenses are nothing more than Xeen’s rehoused. Xeen also has 14, 16, 20, 24, 35, 50, 85, 135mm. They label them 14.5mm or 25mm but they are the same. Funny enough, the T-stops are now 1/10 of a stop faster. Gecko-Cam is now building lenses with Thoma? We use to work with Thoma Turn Tables in Paris. Ask yourselves how Gecko-Cam can build 8 lenses in a matter of approx 18 months. Cannot be serious, not even… Read more »

Johnnie Behiri
Admin

Hi Peter.

Currently out of home base. When back, I promise to get to the bottom of this an come up with a clear answer if it is or not an original lens.

Thank you.

Johnnie

 Technology Analyst
Member
Technology Analyst

Yes, Sony’s decision that the future of cinema is full-frame is very exciting.

There are so many interesting full-frame cinema lens choices, like the Gecko’s above.

It makes me wonder why Directors of Photography would choose to shoot on the Arri Alexa 65 – which requires rehoused Hasselblad lenses – when a full-frame cinema camera has so many more available lenses. Sony knows which way this is headed.

 Ian Hunter
Member

Exactly, not everyone wants zenith quality imagery. Look for this to become more of a trend, especially for the auteurs. Now, if they can just make a camera with pre-graded in-cam profiles ….