You have probably seen our extensive written guide on how to get Magic Lantern’s 24p working on the 5D Mark III, which also includes a step-by-step instruction on how to end up with usable ProRes 4444 files.

Well, as it turns out, Sebastian here has found a much more straightforward way to post process the raw files from the 5D Mark III which allows us to skip the relatively cumbersome After Effects conversion process. This new process only utilizes Adobe Photoshop’s raw import module, which allows batch processing of files (which is necessary to apply the same settings onto an entire clip consisting of individual DNG files).

Watch our video with a step-by-step instruction on how to end up with editable post-processed files!

Software used:

Adobe Photoshop
Raw2DNG (free)
QuickTime 7

Equipment used:

Canon EOS 5D Mark III
Tito Guillen Reply
Tito Guillen May 16, 2013

closer and closer :)

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Hunter May 16, 2013

Great video! Good to hear theres an app for Mac. Question though: Did you convert from dng > tiff > quicktime apple pro res simply because you plan to edit on FCP? Or is there a different reason I should convert to tiff/pro res, when I can just import an image sequence of dng to After Effects anyways? Thanks!

Nino Leitner Reply
Nino Leitner May 16, 2013

ProRes is beautiful to edit, simple as that – in Final Cut Pro, yes, but also other applications like Premiere. We avoided After Effects because it’s a much slower workflow and it crashed on Sebastian many times when he tried the “old” workflow.

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Ultiva May 16, 2013

Hey- Can you do Files >2 or even >4 Gb with the raw2dngapp?

Greets

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Sebastian Wöber May 17, 2013

I believe we can, not sure if we tried. There are certainly still many bugs in all the apps which have only been recently developed and are still in development.
4GB files are currently the limit for recording on 5D RAW, that’s about 55 seconds.

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Kingsley June 28, 2013

You can have files bigger than 4GB if you format the card in exFAT.

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Joel January 1, 2014

The ML-hacked Canon cameras seem to be able to handle much larger files than 4gb easily enough, however, on a Mac you’re going to have everything over 4gb collected into a .ROO file(s). If you download Hex Fiend for mac, you can open both the .raw and corresponding .roo(s) then copy and past the .roo coding onto the end of the .raw then save as a new .raw file. Sounds complicated but it’s actually quite easy and great if you want a shot that’s longer than say 1:30-2:00.

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Birk May 16, 2013

What is the extension of the raw files? If they’re CR2 files you can just open them in PS as is?

Marcus Uthup Reply
Marcus Uthup May 16, 2013

Raw2DNG link is dead

Cinema5D Reply
Cinema5D May 16, 2013

thank you, now it works again, we fixed it

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Silton Buendia May 16, 2013

Why not just use Lightroom????

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joey December 27, 2013

I would say people have their preference of workflow. in the past i used photoshop for all my workflow then i started using lightroom for all my batch editing. i feel its alot easier to use for color correcting your dng files.

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Silton Buendia May 16, 2013

Just say Lightroom has a bit more tools and better raw options then the photoshop module

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Sebastian Wöber May 17, 2013

Will try Lightroom tomorrow. Had bad experience with overwhelming Lightroom in the past, maybe it’s fixed by now.

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ilia djondric May 17, 2013

could this be done using Aperture?

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Sebastian Wöber May 17, 2013

please try it.

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albert May 17, 2013

You guys are awesome. Your work is so revolutionary. I knew that the mark iii could do more, and you opened that door to all of us. Will be it testing this weekend.

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Sebastian Wöber May 17, 2013

Indeed, congrats to the Magic Lantern team.

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Hunter May 17, 2013

Thanks for response! Does anybody have link to the ML that actually does the 24p RAW video? I can’t tell if the nightly build section on their website is where to find it or on other download page.

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Sebastian Wöber May 17, 2013

Hi Hunter, please follow our step-by-step guide here: http://c5d.at/1o4

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Akos May 17, 2013

I have been doing this for 5 years now…. opening video in photoshop’s raw interface… LOL…

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André May 17, 2013

This is what we have been doing with timelapse photography all along, so I never understood the initial reaction about how hard it were :)

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Sebastian Leitner May 17, 2013

aloha! yeah – cool stuff. i’d like to add the following: first off you’d need QT7 pro for that and working prores codecs for QT7 (not so simple to get it working on some systems in my experience – lots of troubles activating QT7). also: QT7 is not the best renderer, because it introduces a gamma-shift and is not really built for HQ. a step up would be using compressor (even though it uses QT7 engine but has a lot of settings to repair the gamma shift for example – it also has a preview window and works with batch folders). or tools like mpeg streamclip also offer the possibility to use a folder full of pictures. one could also get it straight to DCP with openDCP. but then again: the color space will be a little issue. as long as you stay in a sRGB codec like prores and Tiff it should be fine.

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Sebastian Wöber May 17, 2013

Hi Seb,
Yeah, I guess the time is coming that people don’t have Final Cut 7 installed anymore. You can certainly do anything else with these .tif files too.

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Zeek Earl May 21, 2013

I would also like to point out you can directly import .TIFF sequences into Premiere, and then of course export to ProRes etc… from there

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André May 17, 2013

And you can just import all the still images inside your NLE as an Image Sequence, without the need for further compression until you need to output your video.

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Sebastian Wöber May 17, 2013

If your machine can handle it that is.

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André May 17, 2013

My 5 year old Mac Pro can handle it, so any modern Core i7 iMac or MacBook Pro should have no trouble what-so-ever.

Real-time playback of image sequences isn’t really that demanding.

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Cristian Buru May 17, 2013

Unfortunately in this workflow you save files as 8-bit tiffs, basically negating any CC work later.

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Ben May 17, 2013

As long as you have photoshop extended, it seems to make more sense to export the files within photoshop. Open as an image sequence >export > render to video. That would help skip the step of having to open another program!

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Dominic May 18, 2013

Netten Hackintosh hast du da.

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Nitsan Simantov May 18, 2013

Thanks very much for this!
I’ve ordered Komputerbay cards and a Transcend card reader. :)

What computer did you use for this? (Rough specs would be fine)
I’m wondering how much I need to upgrade on my machine in order to get similar render speeds to what you got.
Thanks a huge bunch, and sorry if this has been said somewhere already, I don’t see it anywhere.

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Chris Santucci May 20, 2013

As of today, I have a MK3 that records raw as far as I can tell. Photoshop indicates the DNG files are 8bit, but they sure don’t act like 8bit image files. Anyone else seeing this?

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simcity 5 crack May 21, 2013

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Reply
Timoteo comapa May 22, 2013

Gostaria muito de saber tudo sobre essa camera traduzido em portugues

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CameraOnFilms May 26, 2013

Have opened in Photoshop and then made amendments, synchronised and saved images as .tifs. My question is – for someone who doesn’t have QT7 Pro and edits in Premiere Pro CS6 currently, what is the next best step to try? Can you convert the image sequence into ProRes flavours via MPEG Streamclip? I changed 8 bit to 16 bit in Photoshop RAW module and Premiere wouldn’t accept the 16 bit .tiffs as an image sequence?! Thanks for your advice Guys

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CameraOnFilms May 26, 2013

Okay answered my own question to a degree, have opened tifs in MPEG Streamclip and exported them to Quicktime ProRes 444 and can now drag into Premiere. Only problem is that the file does not playback smoothly?? Seems as if it is in slow motion? Thought I’d found my mistake as first export from MPEG Streamclip was at 15fps so changed this to 25 fps and pulled into 25fps sequence but still played back slow and not smooth. I am on a pretty damn fast MacPro and did also render the clip in Premiere first. What did I miss?

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John October 2, 2013

Open in photoshop make changes and save as 16 bit PSD files. You can then open these files as an image sequence directly in Premiere Pro, no need to go to ProRes

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David May 26, 2013

I did everything the exact way you described it here on cinema5D (thx for all this great info btw), but it seems I’ve got a problem with black bars on the left and right of the frame – example here: https://vimeo.com/66885168

I have no idea where the bars come from … does anyone have an idea how to solve that problem? maybe I’m not the only one with this issue … :)

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David May 26, 2013

okay, seems like I just chose the wrong size of the export in quicktime 7, but I still got a black bar at the left of every frame, starting already with the dng’s … :(

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Akos May 26, 2013

one important thing that gets forgotten here: stay in srgb , dont even think about exporting in adobe Rgb or the others, it will seriously change the image brightnesses and saturations. if you export (save as/in) in srgb you will not see any changes after anywhere… not in playback on/in quicktime or in Final Cut Or in After effects.

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Greg Greenhaw May 27, 2013

Hey Sebastian,

How would you best tweak the raw settings to optimizing grading in pro res? Drop the contrast and pump up the blacks? Wouldn’t this get you the most dynamic range once you are in a non raw codec?

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Alex Henschel May 28, 2013

raw2dng says : rm: *.dng: No such file or directory
raw2dng converter GUI for OsX
Beta ver.0.8

and after processing all the frames (4gb) it says :
mkdir: /Volumes/EOS_DIGITAL/DCIM/100EOS5D/M0000000: File exists

so why it doesnt work?

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Raymond May 30, 2013

Same problem but I think beta raw2dng v.9 exists so somedy have the link for download
Thanks

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Cesar O Perez-Beato May 30, 2013

Exactly what I was looking for! Even though my computer gets a little bit lazy sometimes.
Color Correction seems to be the most dragging process. Thanks for the tutorial.

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Cesar O Perez-Beato May 30, 2013

Exactly what I was looking for! Even though my computer gets a little bit lazy sometimes.
Color Correction seems to be the most dragging process.

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Zarick Berger June 1, 2013

QuickTime7 tends to introduce strange mosquito noise into my TIFF files. It seems to me that a much better way is to import the TIFF’s straight into Premiere.

You open premiere, go to import, select the first file of the sequence you want to open, activate the “image sequence” button below on the same window page and click import.

This method gives me perfect colors, no noise and referenced files ready to edit from within Premiere. This feels luxurious…

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keith mann June 3, 2013

raw2dng is giving very light vertical grey bands in my DNG’s. Very noticeable in blue sky areas. Tried different len’s to no avail. Using Magic Lanturn v2.3 NEXT.2813may18.503113. Any ideas?

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yvan June 4, 2013

Sorry Guys.
But to record audio in addition to the raw video. Is there some setting in magic lanter?
Thank you.

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C2 June 6, 2013

MPEG Stream-clip is also very effective for batching your .Tiff files into a usable movie sequence and is very flexible in terms of output.
Find it here http://www.squared5.com/
Also working in LIGHTROOM seems to do the trick for retouching those RAW files, I found it a little easier to use over Photoshop.

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Akpe Ododo June 27, 2013

Any chance of a video tut on a step by step guide to using MPEG Stream-clip and also Lightroom?

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keith mann June 8, 2013

Big problem with QuickTime 7 conversion. QuickTime 7, when you convert the tiff’s to pro rez, you get a desaturated, noisier image (gamma issue?) Avoid this by opening the tiff’s as an image sequence in Photoshop, then export as image sequence to pro rez. Then you get what you saw in ACR

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Fletcher Murray June 9, 2013

When I pulled the files into Adobe Photoshop CS version 8 for the mac, a message said “wrong type of file.” Any ideas what went wrong?

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Harvey Robinson June 10, 2013

I’ve been tweaking the Lightroom workflow. I’ve tested the raw recording all manner of environments, ISO’s and shutter speeds. I have found that at 3200 the images have a slight vertical banding. Has anyone else experienced this?

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Darwis October 31, 2013

Actually the vertical banding is inherent in most circumstances due to the sensor. What i do is denoise the footage and add grain to it to

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Alex June 14, 2013

i tried dragging the RAW file from desktop and it says nothing converted.. thoughts?

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tronics July 10, 2013

Please, can you give feedback if it is possible to drop the dng into Resolve.
To create from there the proxies and grading..

Or is it only possible after generating the tiffs?

Thank you

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Lucas Barros July 13, 2013

Have you tried editing straight from camera with PremiereCS6?

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Martin Bennett September 25, 2013

Great tutorial.

You mentioned that you can “do you colour correction afterwards in your grading suite of choice” Could you explain the process please?

If I want to go down the traditional professional workflow of editing Canon Raw in the same way of Red Code or Arri Alexa. i.e

Shoot
Edit
VFX
Grade

Is this possible with the Canon ML Raw or CDNG?

If I transcode the footage as in the video above i.e. to a Tiff sequence and then Pro Res I have lost all of the benefits of sooting RAW. If I want to do VFX and the grade after the edit.

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Leah September 26, 2013

Great Tutorial. I’m doing work at Diamond View Studios this will really help with. http://dvsmiami.com/portfolio

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Highline Studios September 30, 2013

Awesome tutorial – this workflow is solid, and seems to be very stable. We have been using the raw2dng, exporting to TIFFs, then opening the image sequence in compressor – from there you can do what you like. The results are impressive so far!

http://www.highlinestudios.com

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Jerry Duvall November 22, 2013

Do you find going through Compessor is much cleaner than QT7?

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Jukka Pehkonen October 15, 2013

Have you had any problems with Quicktime encoding the tiffs to prores? I’m getting colour shift to my video when importing the tiffs to QT. I think it takes out some saturation and gives it slightly a green tint. The tiffs are ok after ACR, problems starts with QT.
Any advice?

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Adrian Underhill March 16, 2014

I’m having this same problem as well. Would love to hear if anyone has had any insight on this.

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Jerry Duvall November 22, 2013

I’m curious as to whether when the dng files are loaded into ACR if the bit depth of the individual files should be set to 8 or 16 bit? It certainly makes a difference with stills but also doubles the file size. Anyone have thought on this?

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ThisCameraSpeeds June 7, 2014

Thanks for this great workflow. I am curious if you have ever experienced exposure flicker on a few frames. I am running the old method using After Effects with all three profiles of Adobe Color , and STILL end up getting random flickering frames. I know its a known issue, but I am curious if this photoshop method eliminates it. Usually these come out when the Highlights or Recovery are pushed really far. Thanks in Advance!

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